A Learning Reflection of Asia Pacific Council 2017 by Jenny Toppo

An international student camp was held in Bangalore, India. Student representatives were present in this camp and I had opportunity to meet and interact closely with the students and activists from other countries.

                       It was imperative that students from all parts of Asian countries participated actively in all relevant of decision- making process because it affects their lives today and has implications for their futures. In addition to their intellectual contribution and their ability to mobilize support, they brought unique perspectives that need to be taken into account.

            From group activities I learnt that the environmental problems in other countries are no less than ours. Strengthening the participation of youth in environmental protection is partly a matter of increasing opportunities in governmental organisation, established NGOs and restoration projects; partly a matter of student themselves devising new forms of action, as the preceding example of innovative activism made clear; and partly question  of more effective environmental education and media presentation of environmental issues.

                The cultural night was very enjoyable as we saw each other’s colourful culture, their costumes etc. All the sessions of the camp were interrelated and did justice to the theme of the camp. It has been argued that a focus on the global environment is important because it helps to control for displacement across place. However, global aggregates obscure important local variations, which are substantial. Both environmental well-being and environmental stress are distributed unequally across globe, meaning that issues of distributive justice intersect with environmental concerns.

                  After all this deep study about the camp thing which bothers me is, why has environmental education so far failed to deliver the anticipated benefits? Part of the reason may lie in the kind of education delivered. According to my thought the real problem may not lie in the kind of environmental education being promoted, but rather in the difficulty involved in translating the environmental values commitments into action of any kind, be it terms of lifestyle adjustments or political activism. If so, the right kind of environmental education may not be enough to make much difference.

                       It’s around the time of the year that my mind feels most like a cool deep lake, a place where there is plenty of sustenance and the clarity is remarkably inviting. I say this because I had distinct pleasure to attend the Asia Pacific Council camp and I can’t even express the words of appreciation and admiration I have for this camp. I have feebly attempted to explain my thoughts. I have written this in hope that when I am old and grey, my memory of camp will never fade…….

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